The Changing Face of EUC

The first section of Tuesday’s keynote was devoted to VMware’s End-User Computing division, and they shared their vision for the future of the market.

And let me tell you – it’s game changing.

{Note: I do not have early access to any of the EUC technologies discussed below.  Everything discussed below is from the keynote.]

VMware demonstrated the expanded capabilities in Horizon 6 and the improvements that they’ve made to the Blast protocol.  It’s now possible to deliver 3D applications, such as Autodesk 3D Max and the Adobe Creative Suite, to users without having to install a client on your machine.  Yes, it’s all accessible from an HTML5-enabled web browser.

They demoed CloudVolumes. CloudVolumes is an application layering technology that can overlay desktop applications onto a desktop in real time with no need to recompose linked clone desktops or use complex deployment tools like SCCM.  And it’s easy enough that you can delegate this task to the Help Desk.

And they also talked about the Horizon Suite.  In previous versions of Horizon, the products were stand-alone with limited integration.  VMware has started changing this and more closely integrating the Horizon Suite products in the same way that they’ve been been integrating products into the vCloud Suite.

My employer works in the construction industry, and we have projects across the country.  These jobs often require heavy 3D graphics to support the Autodesk REVIT MEP suite for building information management, and that means deploying workstations that can run MEP effectively to these locations.

The features of the Horizon Suite would change this.  Engineers and Project Managers would be able to access a desktop with AutoCAD from  Safari on an iPad or Chromebook from any jobsite anywhere in the country and provide feedback to engineers in the office.  Engineers would be able to go onsite and work with CAD without having to lug around a 30 pound workstation laptop.

But that wasn’t the most disruptive announcement.  One of the new features that was announced was Project Fargo.  Project Fargo will utilize features in vSphere 6 (currently in beta) to rapidly deploy “disposable” virtual machines up to 30x faster than deploying linked clones.  It almost sounds like the next version of vSphere will be able to use a process similar to forking a process in Linux to build up and tear down desktops.

When you combine Project Fargo with Persona Management (or Liquidware Labs ProfileUnity) and CloudVolumes, you get fully-configured Just-In-Time desktops.

I hope that we’ll hear more about these features over the next couple of months.

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  1. Pingback: Cloud News Report: Top 3 in Cloud – VMworld 2014 Edition

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